The short answer is no.  This is because while you are in bankruptcy you should not be incurring new debt without court permission.  Most of the time a credit card will not issue a card to someone who is in an active bankruptcy case, because they do not want to violate the bankruptcy code and face sanctions from the bankruptcy court.  Furthermore any cards that a debtor has prior to filing the case will be discharged in the bankruptcy case, except under rare exceptions.  Therefore the debtor will not be able to continue to use their cards.

The entire point of a bankruptcy case is to get a fresh start and to get rid of the debt and allowing a debtor to continue to incur debt while in the bankruptcy case complicates and frustrates this goal.  When preparing to file a bankruptcy case a debtor must take a look at their finances and make sure that they are living within their means and question why they would have a need to continue to spend on credit.

If you have any questions about bankruptcy, contact the attorneys at Fears Nachawati today. Call 1.866.705.7584 or send an email to fears@fnlawfirm.com for a free consultation.

In part two of our blog on credit scores, we will discuss how to rebuild your credit score after completing a bankruptcy.

 
While the filing of bankruptcy places a negative report on your credit, rebuilding your credit rating after completing a bankruptcy is a manageable task.  Once completing a bankruptcy, the debtor’s credit report will not reflect a positive credit history, which makes up the largest influence on the overall credit score.  Also included in credit history, is the public record of filing bankruptcy.
One method of keeping at least some positive credit history after completing a bankruptcy is reaffirming debts during a Chapter 7.  In the typical case, debtors have the option of reaffirming their secured debts, including mortgages, car notes, and debts secured by other property such as furniture or electronics.  After reaffirming those debts, the terms essentially stay in place as if they were not including in the bankruptcy.  The payment history for reaffirmed debts should continue to reflect the payments made prior to, and after, the bankruptcy has been completed.
 
Even if there are reaffirmed debts after a bankruptcy, debtors will need to establish a positive credit history to help rebuild their credit after the completion of their case.  One method of establishing a positive credit history is to open, and use, a credit card after discharge.  While many debtors believe they will be unable to qualify for a credit card after bankruptcy, they will likely get inundated with credit card offers soon after their discharge.  Although there is generally a negative perception to one’s ability to maintain credit with a bankruptcy on their record, many lenders will offer credit to recent bankruptcy filers because their debt has likely been eliminated and they are ineligible for another discharge for eight years.  
 
It is important to note that any credit cards obtained after a recent discharge will likely come with unfavorable terms and high interest rates.  Accordingly, it is generally considered the better practice to open one or two secured credit credits after bankruptcy.  Secured credit cards work like regular credit cards but require a security deposit to open which generally range between $500-$1,500.  The deposit typically becomes the credit limit for the card.  As with unsecured credit cards, each offer varying terms and differing interest rates.  When using the card to establish and build credit, it is important to use the card each month and pay off the entire balance.  Prior to signing up for a secured credit card, you will want to ensure the issuer reports to all three major credit bureaus.  After a period of making regular payments on time, you will eventually qualify for an unsecured credit card at near market terms.
 
After building a positive credit history through the use of credit cards, you can eventually look to purchase a car or even a house.  Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”) loans are available to former debtors after 2 years from a Chapter 7 discharge.  In addition, FHA loans may be obtained during a Chapter 13 after one year of timely plan payments.  These timelines may be adjusted if the borrower provides an explanation of extenuating circumstances which led to the bankruptcy filing along with their application for the FHA loan.
 
When working to reestablish your credit and build a favorable credit score, it is important to continue to monitor your credit report for errors and inconsistencies.  While there are Credit Repair companies willing to assist, these companies are generally perceived as a scam.  Disputes to information on the credit report can be done effectively on a “Do-it-Yourself” basis.  Most disputes can be completed online at through the websites for the three major credit reporting companies.
 
GUIDELINE FOR IMPROVING CREDIT
 
Below is a suggestion for steps to take following bankruptcy to rebuild credit:
 
1) Get a Credit Report and Check Your Score
 
Credit reports can be obtained for free from each agency once per year.  After completing a bankruptcy, it is important to review the credit report to check for any errors.  Make sure debts which were discharged are reflected correctly.  Also ensure that any debts which were reaffirmed continue to show the credit history.  Dispute any inconsistencies with the credit agencies.  
 
2) Open a Bank Account
 
If you do not already have a checking or savings account, open a new account.  Get an account that allows automatic bill pay and set it up to prevent missed or late payments.
 
3) Apply for a Secured Credit Card
 
Although you will receive offers for unsecured credit cards shortly after completing bankruptcy, secured credit cards will likely provide better terms and lower limits which should help prevent falling back into debt.  The credit limit on secured credit cards is generally the deposit required to open the account.
 
4) Pay Off the Balance Every Month
 
Make sure to use the card to make small purchases every month.  Having an open credit card without any usage does not help build credit.  It is also important to pay the balance in full on time each month.  The amount of debt owed makes up a large portion of the credit score.  Because the credit limit is likely to be small when opening secured credit cards, it is best to not leave running balances on the cards from month to month.  Paying off the balance in full also prevents accruing interest.
 
5) Continue to Monitor Your Credit
 
Continue to pull a credit report and monitor for inconsistencies.  Make sure any new accounts are showing their timely payments and continue to dispute any incorrect information.  As previously mentioned, you are entitled to one free credit report per agency per year.  It is best to spread these free reports over the year and obtain a report every 3-4 months from one agency at a time.

If you have any questions about Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcy, contact the attorneys at Fears Nachawati today. Call 1.866.705.7584 or send an email to fears@fnlawfirm.com for a free consultation.

  In this series on Credit Scores, I will discuss the various types of credit reports and the factors which influence your credit score.  Credit reports consist of detailed information regarding an individual’s current and past financial obligations.  Credit scores are essentially a numerical grade of the information contained within the credit report.  These scores are used by credit card issuers, auto lenders, mortgage companies, and other lenders to judge the applicants financial responsibility prior to issuing credit. Remember you can obtain your free credit report from each agency one time per year at www.annualcreditreport.com.  Contact the attorneys at Fears Nachawati with any questions. 

 
TYPES OF CREDIT SCORES
  1. FICO Scores – FICO (otherwise known as the Fair Isaac Corporation), created the first credit scores in the 1950s. Since their creation, FICO scores remain the most widely used scoring model by lenders with over an estimated 90 percent of the market share in 2010 of scores sold to firm for use in credit related decisions.  Although there are different FICO scoring models, the scores generally range from 300 to 850.
  1. Credit Reporting Agency Scores – Credit Reporting Agencies (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion) each utilize their own scoring model, which causes scores to vary among the three main agencies.  These scores were originally created to predict performance on credit obligations.  However, today these scores are primarily used as educational scores for consumers.  Each agency uses differing ranges of scores.  For example:
    • Equifax’s Credit Score ranges from 280 to 850.

    • Experian Plus Score ranges from 330-830.

    • TransUnion TransRisk New Account Score ranges from 300-850.

  1. VantageScore – VantageScore is produced by VantageScore LLC, which is a joint venture of the three credit reporting agencies.  It was developed as a competitor to FICO. VantageScore results range on a scale from 501-990.
CALCULATING THE CREDIT SCORE
 
While there are multiple credit scores, as noted above, the credit score of primary concern is the FICO score.  The FICO score is generally based on five categories, each of which are weighted to have a varying impact on the overall score.  These categories, sorted by overall importance, are:
  • -Payment History (35%)
Credit payment history is one of the most important factors in a FICO score.  Lenders, who want to know whether you’ve paid past credit accounts on time, place a heavy reliance on payment history.  While a few late payments may not have a major impact on the credit score, numerous late payments, or a history of routinely late payments, will significantly drop the credit score.  FICO specifically looks at how late the payments were made, how much was owed, how recently the late payments occurred, and how many late payments are on the account.  Typically, late payments are reported as either 30 days late, 60 days late, 90 days late, 120 days late, 150 days late, or a charge off.  It is important to note that when a debt is “charged off,” it does not mean that debt is no longer owed.
 
Account types considered for payment history include credit cards, retail accounts (i.e. department store credit cards), installment loans, finance company accounts, and mortgage loans.  Public records and collection items also fall under the payment history category, which include the filing of bankruptcy.  Paying accounts on time, or a good track record on most of your accounts, will have a positive influence and increase your credit score.
 
  • Amounts Owed (30%)
The second leading influence on credit scores is the amount of debt owed on specific accounts.  Credit scores are affected by the number of accounts you have with balances.  In addition, the proportion of credit limits utilized will affect the credit score as well.  For example, when someone is approaching their credit limit on a card, this may indicated that they are overextended and more likely to make late or missed payments.
  • Length of Credit History (15%)
As the category suggests, the length of time your credit account has been open influences your credit score.  Having numerous recently opened accounts will negatively impact your score.  In addition, the length of time from your last activity on an account may also lower your score.
 
  • Types of Credit in Use (10%)
Credit scores are effected by total number of open accounts you have and the overall makeup of that mix of credit.  It is not necessary to have each type of credit account considered to establish good credit.  However, it is also important not to open a lot of accounts you do not intend to use.  
  • New Credit (10%)
The number of recently opened accounts will effect the credit score.  Opening multiple credit cards in a short period of time may negatively effect your score.  In addition, running up high balances on recently opened cards will also have a negative impact.  
 
Credit inquires also fall into the New Credit category when determining the credit score.  Checking your credit report will not effect your credit score as long as the report is obtained directly from the credit reporting agency.  Reports from all three may be obtained for free from www.annualcreditreport.com.  Multiple credit inquires from creditors may negatively impact your score.  However, numerous inquires in a short period of time, such as when shopping for a car, are typically treated as a single inquiry and will have little impact on the overall credit score.
 

Most Facebookers (noun. A person using the social networking website Facebook) know that “friending” someone can enhance or soil a personal reputation. Companies use social media regularly as part of the hiring process. A person’s online reputation may be the difference between getting hired and losing a job opportunity.

Recently it was discovered that Facebook patented technology that could allow lenders to use a borrower’s social network to determine whether he or she is a good credit risk.
 
The technology averages the credit ratings of the borrower’s Facebook friends and provides this score to a lender for consideration of the borrower’s credit application. The patent states: “If the average credit rating of these members is at least a minimum credit score, the lender continues to process the loan application. Otherwise, the loan application is rejected.” 
 
This is the ultimate example of “guilt by association” that your mother always warned you about.
 
Facebook has not commented regarding this technology, and it is not clear whether it will ever be used. The federal Equal Credit Opportunity Act strictly regulates what criteria creditors can use when deciding on a loan — things like income, expenses, debts and credit history determine creditworthiness.
 
For now, it may be prudent to consider the possible implications (and future risks) of friending someone on Facebook. That’s not just good advice — it could make a huge difference to your future financial success.
 
If you are considering filing for bankruptcy please call the experienced attorneys at Fears | Nachawati Law Firm to set up a free consultation. Call 1.866.705.7584 or send an email to fears@fnlawfirm.com.
 

Note: This article is a continuation from Part One of the Simple Guide to Rebuilding Your Credit after Bankruptcy.

Six Months after Discharge
  • Apply for an unsecured credit card. An internet search will help in your research to find unsecured cards for individuals with a recent bankruptcy discharge. If you are declined, call the company immediately and request a reconsideration. Charge on this card monthly, but no more than $100 on this card, ever. Pay this card off completely every month as soon as you get the bill.
  • Apply for a gas or retail store card. Gas and retail cards typically don’t require applicants to have good credit and, in fact, cater to folks with blemished credit.
One Year after Discharge 
  • When your secured loan at the credit union ends, request an unsecured loan between $1,000 and $2,000. You should also discuss options for an unsecured credit card through the credit union.
  • Obtain new credit bureau reports from http://www.annualcreditreport.com and review these reports for accuracy. It is surprising how often discharged debts can “magically” reappear on an individual’s credit report.
  • A new vehicle purchase should be put off until at least one year after your bankruptcy discharge. A credit score can recover quickly after bankruptcy, and many captive finance companies (e.g. Ford Motor Credit) require both a reasonable credit score and recent history of on-time payments. A new vehicle loan is a major credit purchase, and on-time payments will propel your credit score upwards and demonstrate responsible management of significant credit. 
Two Years after Discharge
  • Obtain new credit bureau reports from http://www.annualcreditreport.com. Review these reports for accuracy. Many bankruptcy debtors are able to obtain an above-average or even excellent credit score within two years after bankruptcy.
  • A home purchase is available to many debtors two years after a bankruptcy discharge. Most government-backed loans require a two year “seasoning” after a bankruptcy discharge. Speaking with your credit union about their loan products is a good first step in the home purchase process.

If you are considering filing for bankruptcy please call the experienced attorneys at Fears | Nachawati Law Firm to set up a free consultation. Call 1.866.705.7584 or send an email to fears@fnlawfirm.com.

This is a simple guide for rebuilding your credit after a bankruptcy discharge. Recovering from the effects of bankruptcy takes time and attention. This guide suggests a basic 24 month timeline for rebuilding credit.

 
T minus One
Before your bankruptcy case is discharged, be sure to review your bankruptcy schedules and consider how your financial situation may have changed. It is very important to understand how your finances will be impacted by bankruptcy court’s discharge order. Some questions to ask are:
1.Which debts are discharged?
2.Are any other debtors impacted by this discharge (such as friends or family)?
3.Which debts are not discharged?
4.Do any liens survive the discharge?
5.Has the bankruptcy court avoided any liens on secured property (or judgment liens)?
6.Have I discharged my personal obligation to pay on a secured debt, but a lien survives?
 
At this point it is critical to have a clear and complete knowledge of who and how much you owe. Any debts that survive the bankruptcy must be paid on-time.
 
Immediately after Discharge
Congratulations! Rebuilding your credit begins now.
  • Collect all your bankruptcy paperwork, including a complete copy of your bankruptcy petition, schedules, and discharge order, and put these documents in a safe place.
  • Sign up for a three bureau credit monitoring service. You don’t want any surprises popping up on your credit. 
  • Obtain a copy of your credit report from each of the main credit reporting bureaus: Transunion, Experian, and Equifax. One free report from each of these bureaus is available every twelve months from http://www.annualcreditreport.com
  • Review each credit report and identify every debt that was discharged by your bankruptcy case. Each of these debts should be noted as:
    • Zero Balance;
    • Included in Bankruptcy; and
    • Current

It may be necessary to file a dispute with the credit bureau to ensure that the discharged debts are reported accurately. The credit bureaus are obligated to report back to you within thirty days and send a new, updated copy of your credit report.

  • Apply for a secured credit card that will “graduate” to an unsecured card within 12 months. Note that not all secured cards graduate. Secure this card with a minimum deposit of $500. Charge on this card monthly, but no more than $100 on this card, ever. Pay this card off completely every month as soon as you get the bill.
  • Go to your nearest credit union and open a new bank account. You may want to consider direct deposit and automatic bill pay options.
  • Open a one year / $1,000 secured loan at the credit union. The bank will place your $1,000 into an interest bearing account. Make your payment every month on-time. 
More to come in the next post.
 
If you are considering filing for bankruptcy please call the experienced attorneys at Fears | Nachawati Law Firm to set up a free consultation. Call 1.866.705.7584 or send an email to fears@fnlawfirm.com.

Bankruptcy attorneys are in the business of representing bankruptcy clients. Consequently, asking a bankruptcy attorney whether you should file bankruptcy is a lot like asking the salesman at the Ford dealership whether you should buy a new Chevy Camaro. You will likely get a very biased and self-serving answer. So today, instead of extolling the virtues of bankruptcy, let’s take a hard look at the down-side of filing bankruptcy.

 

Continue Reading Negative Aspects of Bankruptcy

Bankruptcy is no longer the credit “death sentence” that it used to be. While it is true that most people’s credit score takes a hit initially after filing bankruptcy, we find that for most of our clients, about a year or so after filing bankruptcy, their credit scores have improved markedly. The real truth is if you’re at the point of considering bankruptcy, your credit history has probably already hit a rough patch. If you’re already behind on a ton of credit cards, medical bills, and have a repossession or foreclosure, bankruptcy won’t hurt your credit score all that much and can be an invaluable tool to get you back on the right track.

Something to keep in mind is that a large portion of determining credit worthiness depends on outstanding liabilities. After you complete a Chapter 7, a large portion of your liabilities are taken off the books—meaning you have money to spend and not a whole lot of active debt obligations. A good deal of our clients are shocked when they begin to receive credit card and vehicle offers soon after filing bankruptcy, but this is typical. Another reason credit companies will view you as a good risk is because they know that once you file for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you can’t do so again for another 8 years.

Yet another way to help quickly rebuild your credit after bankruptcy is by completing a “reaffirmation agreement” on your secured debts after your bankruptcy is filed. This will allow your creditors to continue reporting the status of your secured debts, like a home mortgage or car note. While credit reporting is not the only consideration in reaffirming a debt, it can be a big one and can help rebuild credit.

If you are looking into bankruptcy and want to know more about what bankruptcy can do to get you back on the right track, contact the helpful attorneys at Fears | Nachawati today. Call us at 1.866.705.7584, or send an email to fears@fnlawfirm.com

It seems obvious that an individual should collect all of his debts and creditor information before filing bankruptcy. However, many debtors arrive at their attorney’s office for an initial consultation with little or no information about their debts. Fortunately, obtaining debt information is not difficult, but it may take a little time and effort.

Credit Report

Your credit report is the best place to start when gathering information about your debts. Some debtors are surprised to learn that there is not one comprehensive credit report kept on an individual, but many reports collected by different agencies. Every consumer credit reporting agency is required by the Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act to provide you with one free copy of your credit report every twelve months. However, collecting a copy of your credit file from each of these agencies is time consuming and pointless for most debtors.

There are three “main” agencies in the consumer credit reporting world: Equifax, Trans Union, and Experian. In order to comply with the federal law, these three agencies have established a website for consumers to quickly obtain an entirely free, no-strings-attached credit report. There is now no need to subscribe to a credit monitoring service or pay money to obtain your credit score. These services are useful in rebuilding credit after bankruptcy, but useless until you receive your discharge.

Obtaining a copy of your credit report is a great step in making a good-faith effort to identify all of your creditors. However, it is important not to rely exclusively on the information contained in the credit reports. Not all creditors report to the credit reporting agencies. Additionally, the information contained in your reports may be inaccurate, outdated, or incomplete.

Mail

The US Postal Service is another excellent source for obtaining debt information. Creditors and collection agencies are very good at sending monthly bills when you owe them money. Collect your mail for a month and you will have a good start on listing your creditors.

Forgotten Debts

A creditor is sometimes forgotten or overlooked when preparing the debtor’s bankruptcy schedules. Even the most diligent individual can occasionally forget a past debt. When this happens, the bankruptcy law offers several remedies:

If an omitted creditor is discovered during the bankruptcy case, the law requires the debtor to file amended schedules and identify the creditor. The debtor has an obligation to ensure all creditors are identified and receive notice of the bankruptcy case. Intentionally failing to list a creditor can cause that debt to be declared non-dischargeable and survive the bankruptcy.

Sometimes even the most diligent debtor will forget a creditor. Things get trickier if the omission is discovered after the bankruptcy case has closed. How the debtor proceeds will depend on the court and the circumstances. In many cases an omitted creditor is considered discharged as a matter of law. Failure to list a creditor means that the creditor did not receive notice of the bankruptcy case and was not given an opportunity to protect its interests during the case. However, if none of the debtor’s assets were distributed to creditors, many bankruptcy courts say the omission did not have any practical effect. In these cases it did not matter that the creditor did not receive notice, the debt is discharged anyway.

Conversely, if an omitted creditor loses the opportunity to receive money through the bankruptcy, the omission matters a great deal. Under these circumstances the failure to include the creditor means the debt cannot be discharged and the debtor is stuck with paying the debt. Intentionally omitting a creditor can also be grounds for a complete denial of bankruptcy discharge, so it is important to include all of your creditors in the bankruptcy process.

There are many myths circulating regarding bankruptcy. One of the most popular myths is that a bankruptcy debtor can pick and choose which debts are included in the bankruptcy discharge. This myth is simply the result of a misunderstanding of the discharge process. When you file bankruptcy you are required to honestly disclose all personal financial information to the best of your ability. That means listing all of your income, expenses, assets, and debts in your bankruptcy schedules. Intentionally failing to list a debt is a very serious matter and the bankruptcy court could deny your discharge if you are less than honest.

In many cases a bankruptcy debtor has a good reason for wanting to continue paying on a debt. The most common reason is to retain property used as security for a loan (e.g. a car or house loan). In bankruptcy, secured property must be paid for or returned. Fortunately, the bankruptcy code allows the debtor to continue paying the secured creditor and keep the property. If you are interested in keeping secured property, discuss your situation with your bankruptcy attorney.

In other cases a debtor may want to continue to pay an unsecured creditor. This is normally the case when the discharge of a debt in bankruptcy will cause financial harm to a co-debtor. For instance, you may owe money to a family member that you want to repay. The bankruptcy discharges the legal obligation to pay the debt, and enjoins the creditor from seeking collection. However, while the bankruptcy prevents your family member from asking for payment, it does not prevent you from making voluntarily payments after the bankruptcy.

The same voluntary payment principle applies to medical bills, credit cards, and any other financial obligation. Voluntary payments do not alter the bankruptcy court’s discharge injunction. A discharged creditor is forever prohibited from taking any action to collect on the discharged debt, including asking for payment, sending a bill or statement, or filing a lawsuit against you.

The Bankruptcy Code provides, “Nothing contained in. . . this section prevents a debtor from voluntarily repaying any debt.” 11 U.S.C. § 524(f). Any debt that is discharged during bankruptcy can be voluntarily repaid. Creditors are still under the court’s prohibition against taking action to collect, but are free to receive payments made voluntarily by the debtor. The term “voluntarily” means free from creditor influence or inducement. A creditor may not send a bill or take any collection action against you.

Voluntary payments do not invalidate the discharge order and do not create a new legal obligation. “Debtors who file under [Chapter 7] can dispose of their post-petition earnings as they choose, including voluntary repayment of debts otherwise dischargeable in bankruptcy.” In re Hellums, 772 F.2d 379, 381 (7th Cir. 1985). You can pay back whomever you wish. If you or a loved one is considering filing bankruptcy, contact the experienced attorneys at Fears | Nachawati Law Firm for a free consultation. Please call us at 1.866.705.7584 or send an email to fears@fnlawfirm.com.
 

 As if deciphering the Bankruptcy Code wasn’t hard enough, sometimes Congress hides little traps for bankruptcy attorneys in other laws. These laws deny discharge to debtors for certain debts to the federal government for educational or other benefits.

 

HEAL Loans

The Federal Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL) Program was a student loan program for eligible graduate students in schools of medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatry, public health, pharmacy or chiropractic and in programs in health administration and clinical psychology. New HEAL loans to student borrowers were discontinued in 1998, and HEAL refinancing terminated in 2004. Under 42 U.S.C. sec. 292f(g), a HEAL loan is only dischargeable if denying the discharge would be “unconscionable.”

 

Armed Services Debts

37 USC sec. 303a(e)(4) provides that special pay, incentive pay, or educational benefits paid to a service member may not be discharged in bankruptcy within five years after termination of service. A list of various military incentive and bonus programs is contained in Subchapter I, Chapter 5 of Title 37, and the repayment provisions must reference §303a for the discharge limitation to apply.

Section 303(a) includes benefits received while attending a military service academy. After the initial five years prohibition period, section 523(a)(8) prohibits discharge of a service academy debt under the same rules as civilian educational loans. Section 303(a) also excludes from discharge penalties for failure to participate in Select Reserve programs that had associated educational assistance. See 10 USC §16135.

 

Troops to Teachers

Financial assistance granted to a service member for participation in the troops-to-teachers program is not dischargeable under any circumstance. See 20 USC 6674(f)(3).

 

Government Fines

While Section 523 of the Bankruptcy Code makes a criminal fine nondischargeable, 18 USC 3613 makes any civil judgment obtained by the United States to enforce the fine non-dischargeable.

 

Indian Heath Scholarships

An American Indian scholarship grant to pursue a health profession career has bankruptcy discharge restrictions if the student leaves school or fails to fulfill the subsequent service obligations. The debt is not dischargeable for five years from the date repayment is first due. See 25 USC §1616a.

 

Veterans Benefits

Benefits that are owed under the Veteran’s Benefits Educational Assistance are not dischargeable for five years. See 38 USC §7634.

Awareness of all the details and exceptions that accompany bankruptcy can overwhelming and daunting when trying to file without the guidance of an attorney. If you are considering bankruptcy, the experienced and reputable bankruptcy attorneys at the Fears | Nachawati Law Firm can offer you the expertise needed to successfully file for bankruptcy and ensure that you are aware of all of the complex details of your case. To get started on the path of financial recovery, contact our office for a free consultation by calling 1.866.705.7584.