There are many false beliefs when it comes to discharged debts.  Some believe that debts are “erased;” others believe that discharged debts are no longer legal obligations. Neither of these beliefs are accurate.

In simple terms, a discharged debt means that the creditor is enjoined from collecting on that debt from the debtor. The bankruptcy

One of the most common causes of bankruptcy includes the accumulation of payday loans. Payday loans are extremely easy to obtain, most borrowers are unable to pay the lenders back in full, which creates an unlimited debt trap.   One major issue which causes payday loans to become difficult to repay is the extremely high

Individuals who have been through the bankruptcy process are often happy to talk about their experiences. Usually this is not a bad thing, but sometimes it can lead to misinformation and unrealistic expectations. How your friend’s debts were treated in her case may be very different from how similar debts are treated in your case.

You are not alone if you have managed to create a substantial amount of debt for yourself over the years. Many Americans have trouble managing their money and it can be very easy to find yourself drowning in debt from student loans, over spending or medical bills. However, there are several ways to reorganize your

Bankruptcy is meant to provide debt relief to honest, but unfortunate individuals. For some, bad luck seems to hang around a while. For others, bad luck seems to have moved in permanently. Unfortunate individuals with continuing or reoccurring debts may find relief through the federal bankruptcy laws which can provide a third, or even fourth

 

The Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 created new obligations for “debt relief agencies” engaging in bankruptcy related services. For a definition of a “debt relief agency,” see 11 U.S.C. §101(12A). The United States Supreme Court in Milavetz v. U.S., 130 S.Ct. 1324 (2010), held that “attorneys are debt relief

Section 109(e) of the Bankruptcy Code sets three basic eligibility requirements for a Chapter 13 debtor:

  1. The debtor must be an “individual.” For bankruptcy purposes, an individual is a subset of a person, and is distinct from a partnership or a corporation. See 11 U.S.C. §101(41). Only real live human beings (“individuals”) are allowed to