In order to file Chapter 7 Bankruptcy, you will need to complete and pass a Means Test, which is filed as part of your bankruptcy paperwork with the Court.  In general, the Means Test takes a six month look at your income and compares that with the median income for a similar family in your state.  If you earn more than the median income, minus allowable expenses, and show enough disposable income to pay back your creditors while maintaining a minimal standard of living, you may not qualify for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy.  However, this does not mean you cannot utilize the protection of the bankruptcy court to help you resolve your financial difficulty.

In the event you do not qualify for a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy, you may still qualify for a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy.  Under Chapter 13, your attorney will calculate a payment plan, which generally ranges from 36-60 months, to provide payments to your creditors in line with your budget.  At the completion of your bankruptcy plan, you are entitled to a discharge of the remaining debt, subject to certain restrictions.  Your bankruptcy plan may only provide for a return of a certain percentage of your unsecured debt, such as medical bills and credit cards.  In the event there is a portion of this debt remaining, it is subject to discharge at the end of the case.  While Chapter 13 takes longer to complete than a Chapter 7, you are still protected from collection efforts, foreclosure, repossession, and lawsuits while you are in an active bankruptcy.  Although you will be placed on a budget, you will have peace of mind by being protected from your creditors while maintaining a manageable payment plan to help get you on the right financial path.

If you have any questions about Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 Bankruptcy, contact the attorneys at Fears Nachawati today. Call 1.866.705.7584 or send an email to fears@fnlawfirm.com for a free consultation.